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By infini

The first time I saw a space NDN was in The 6th World, a short film by Diné director Nanobah Becker that extends the Diné creation story into outer space, where humanity’s future is made possible through ancestral corn crops on Mars. The movie was released in 2012, the same year Walking the Clouds: An Anthology of Indigenous Science Fiction was published, the first-ever anthology of its kind. This was the official inauguration of indigenous futurism. The movement is in part about speaking back to the SF genre, which has long used indigenous subjects as the foils to stories …read more

Source:: Indigenous Science Fiction narratives

      

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By kagredon Godus, billed as a spiritual successor to beloved classic God-game Populous, raised £526,563 on Kickstarter in late 2012, after being teased in the controversial mobile “event” Curiosity (previously.) A well-received demo at PAX Prime in 2013 fueled more hype, but the Steam Early access launch that followed was met with lukewarm reviews, and the release of a freemium iOS version heightened the backlash. It now appears that Godus may be on the brink of abandonment, in the wake of staff shake-ups, Molyneux announcing a new project, and an admission that …read more

Source:: Godus Ex Machina

      

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By filthy light thief The history of paper engineering in books, or the making of “pop-up books” didn’t start as a way to entertain children, but in the search for more tools to educate adults, including some proto-computers from as early as the 13th century. Let Ellen G. K. Rubin, known also as The Popup Lady, regale and inform you at length, in either the form of a 50 minute presentation for the Smithsonian Libraries, or read through her website, where she has a timeline of movable books and see the glossary for definitions of the different movements …read more

Source:: Paper Engineering: Over 700 years of Fold, Pull, Pop & Turn

      

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By starvingartist Richard Sher, host of NPR radio game show Says You!, has died at 66.

I listened to the show religiously when I lived in Cleveland, and even attended a taping at a theater in the Detroit Shoreway neighborhood. I can be heard yelling out the answer to a question that none of the panelists could answer correctly, about the origin of the phrase “willy-nilly”.

…read more

Source:: RIP Richard Sher

      

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By standardasparagus Walter Pitts rose from the streets to MIT, but couldn’t escape himself. Pitts was used to being bullied. He’d been born into a tough family in Prohibition-era Detroit, where his father, a boiler-maker, had no trouble raising his fists to get his way. The neighborhood boys weren’t much better. One afternoon in 1935, they chased him through the streets until he ducked into the local library to hide. The library was familiar ground, where he had taught himself Greek, Latin, logic, and mathematics—better than home, where his father insisted he drop out of school and go to work. Outside, …read more

Source:: The Man Who Tried to Redeem the World with Logic

      

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By adamvasco The Cast
New Yorker: – What happened to Alberto Nisman?
El Pais : – Argentinean prosecutor drafted arrest warrant for Fernández de Kirchner.
WSJ : – First his death was declared a suicide; now Argentina’s president says it was the work of her enemies. What about Tehran?
NYT : -Reining In Argentina’s Spymasters.
Grauniad : – Argentina investigates mystery DNA found at dead prosecutor’s home.
Arutz Sheva : – Aide Who Gave Gun to Nisman is Fired.
Bloomberg : – Who and where is Antonio Stiuso?
Grauniad : – The shady history of …read more

Source:: Tinfoil hats at the ready please